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11191 profile_image Even movie "Real" didn't go so well... we would like t.... 0 0
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profile_image kaushdiz Level 7 2017.07.26 smartphone
Even movie "Real" didn't go so well... we would like to see you with a new drama...before you go to military service....

11190 profile_image Even it's time for school 2017 still i can't forget Han-i- han from ..... 0 0
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Even it's time for school 2017 still i can't forget Han-i- han from school 2015 Who are you...

11189 profile_image Hello everyone its nice to see you all after a very long time. I'm sorry c.... 0 0
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profile_image kaushdiz Level 7 2017.07.26 smartphone
Hello everyone its nice to see you all after a very long time. I'm sorry couldn't come here because of personal reasons. But thanx for being active... fighting!!!

11188 profile_image Sweets Traditional rice cakes, tteok and Korean confectionery hangwa are ea... 0 0
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profile_image Shabnam(이슬) Level 9 2017.07.20
Sweets


Traditional rice cakes, tteok and Korean confectionery hangwa are eaten as treats during holidays and festivals. Tteok refers to all kinds of rice cakes made from either pounded rice (메떡, metteok), pounded glutinous rice (찰떡, chaltteok), or glutinous rice left whole, without pounding. It is served either filled or covered with sweetened mung bean paste, red bean paste, mashed red beans, raisins, a sweetened filling made with sesame seeds, sweet pumpkin, beans, jujubes, pine nuts or honey). Tteok is usually served as dessert or as a snack. Among varieties, songpyeon is a chewy stuffed tteok served at Chuseok. Honey or another soft sweet material such as sweetened sesame or black beans are used as fillings. Pine needles can be used for imparting flavor during the steaming process. Yaksik is a sweet rice cake made with glutinous rice, chestnuts, pine nuts, jujubes, and other ingredients, while chapssaltteok is a tteok filled with sweet bean paste.

On the other hand, hangwa is a general term referring to all types of Korean traditional confectionery. The ingredients of hahngwa mainly consist of grain flour, honey, yeot, and sugar, or of fruit and edible roots. Hangwa is largely divided into yumilgwa (fried confectionery), suksilgwa, jeonggwa, gwapyeon, dasik (tea food) and yeot. Yumilgwa is made by stir frying or frying pieces of dough, such as maejakgwa and yakgwa. Maejakgwa is a ring-shaped confection made of wheat flour, vegetable oil, cinnamon, ginger juice, jocheong, and pine nuts, while yakgwa, literally "medicinal confectionery", is a flower-shaped biscuit made of honey, sesame oil and wheat flour.

Suksilgwa is made by boiling fruits, ginger, or nuts in water, and then forming the mix into the original fruit's shape, or other shapes. Gwapyeon is a jelly-like confection made by boiling sour fruits, starch, and sugar. Dasik, literally "eatery for tea", is made by kneading rice flour, honey, and various types of flour from nuts, herbs, sesame, or jujubes. Jeonggwa, or jeongwa, is made by boiling fruits, plant roots and seeds in honey, mullyeot (물엿, liquid candy) or sugar. It is similar to marmalade or jam/jelly.Yeot is a Korean traditional candy in liquid or solid form made from steamed rice, glutinous rice, glutinous kaoliang, corn, sweet potatoes or mixed grains. The steamed ingredients are lightly fermented and boiled in a large pot called sot (솥) for a long time.

11187 profile_image Dining A single person bapsang(meal table). Each person was given a table in tr.... 1 0
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profile_image Shabnam(이슬) Level 9 2017.07.20
Dining
A single person bapsang(meal table). Each person was given a table in traditional dining setting.
Korean chopsticks and spoon made of stainless steel.

Dining etiquette in Korea can be traced back to the Confucian philosophies of the Joseon period. Guidebooks, such as Sasojeol (士小節, Elementary Etiquette for Scholar Families), written in 1775 by Yi Deokmu (이덕무; 李德懋), comment on the dining etiquette for the period. Suggestions include items such as "when you see a fat cow, goat, pig, or chicken, do not immediately speak of slaughtering, cooking or eating it", "when you are having a meal with others, do not speak of smelly or dirty things, such as boils or diarrhea," "when eating a meal, neither eat so slowly as to appear to be eating against your will nor so fast as if to be taking someone else's food. Do not throw chopsticks on the table. Spoons should not touch plates, making a clashing sound", amongst many other recommendations which emphasized proper table etiquette.

The eldest male at the table was always served first, commonly served to them in the men's quarters by the women of the house. Women usually dined in a separate portion of the house after the men were served. The eldest men or women always ate before the younger family members. The meal was usually quiet, as conversation was discouraged during meals. In modern times, these rules have become lax, as families usually dine together now and use the time to converse. Of the remaining elements of this decorum, one is that the younger members of the table should not pick up their chopsticks or start eating before the elders of the table or guests and should not finish eating before the elders or guests finish eating.

In Korea, unlike in China, Japan and Vietnam, the rice or soup bowl is not lifted from the table when eating from it. This is due to the fact that each diner is given a metal spoon along with the chopsticks known collectively as sujeo. The use of the spoon for eating rice and soups is expected. There are rules which reflect the decorum of sharing communal side dishes; rules include not picking through the dishes for certain items while leaving others, and the spoon used should be clean, because usually diners put their spoons in the same serving bowl on the table. Diners should also cover their mouths when using a toothpick after the meal.

The table setup is important as well, and individual place settings, moving from the diner's left should be as follows: rice bowl, spoon, then chopsticks. Hot foods are set to the right side of the table, with the cold foods to the left. Soup must remain on the right side of the diner along with stews. Vegetables remain on the left along with the rice, and kimchi is set to the back while sauces remain in the front.

Drinking

The manner of drinking alcoholic drinks at dining is significant in Korean dining etiquette. Each diner is expected to face away from the eldest male and cover his mouth when drinking alcohol. According to Hyang Eum Ju Rye (향음주례; 鄕飮酒禮), the drinking etiquette established in Choseon Dynasty, it is impolite for a king and his vassal, a father and his son, or a teacher and his student to drink face to face. Also, a guest should not refuse the first drink offered by host, and in the most formal situations, the diner should politely refuse twice a drink offered by the eldest male or a host. When the host offers for the third time, then finally the guest can receive it. If the guest refuses three times, drink is not to be offered any more.

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11186 profile_image Noodles Japchae, a kind of Korean noodle dish made with marinated beef and vege.... 1 0
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profile_image Shabnam(이슬) Level 9 2017.07.20
Noodles
Japchae, a kind of Korean noodle dish made with marinated beef and vegetables in soy sauce and sesame oil.
Main article: Korean noodles

Noodles or noodle dishes in Korean cuisine are collectively referred to as guksu in native Korean or myeon in hanja. While noodles were eaten in Korea from ancient times, productions of wheat was less than other crops, so wheat noodles did not become a daily food until 1945. Wheat noodles (milguksu) were specialty foods for birthdays, weddings or auspicious occasions because the long and continued shape were thought to be associated with the bliss for longevity and long-lasting marriage.

In Korean traditional noodle dishes are onmyeon or guksu jangguk (noodles with a hot clear broth), naengmyeon (cold buckwheat noodles), bibim guksu (cold noodle dish mixed with vegetables), kalguksu (knife-cut noodles), kongguksu (noodles with a cold soybean broth), japchae (cellophane noodles made from sweet potato with various vegetables) and others. In royal court, baekmyeon (literally "white noodles") consisting of buckwheat noodles and pheasant broth, was regarded as the top quality noodle dish. Naengmyeon with a cold soup mixed with dongchimi (watery radish kimchi) and beef brisket broth was eaten in court during summer.

Jajangmyeon, a staple Koreanized Chinese noodle dish, is extremely popular in Korea as fast, take-out food. It is made with a black bean sauce usually fried with diced pork or seafood and a variety of vegetables, including zucchini and potatoes. It is popularly ordered and delivered, like Chinese take-out food in other parts of the world.
Ramyeon refers to Korean instant noodles similar to ramen.

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11185 profile_image Enjoy everything Korean department stores have to offer! Take advantage of the.... 0 2
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profile_image hasnaafaf Level 9 2017.07.20
Enjoy everything Korean department stores have to offer!
Take advantage of the benefits of the Seoul Summer Sale 2017, and indulge in the true Korean department store shopping experience.
- More information on Seoul Summer Sale 2017 benefits and discounts » http://english.visitseoul.net/summerSale2017/index-shop

11184 profile_image Hello Friends, Discover incredible and beautiful Korea 0 3
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profile_image Kairali Level 7 2017.07.20
Hello Friends,
Discover incredible and beautiful Korea

11183 profile_image EXO_Ko Ko Bop_Music Video 0 3
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profile_image anum lubis Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_Ko Ko Bop_Music Video

11182 profile_image EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip 1 1
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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip

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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip

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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip

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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip

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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip

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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
EXO_THE WAR_Teaser Clip

11174 profile_image and here it is... the Music Video of Ko Ko Bop is out today~^^!!! 0 2
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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
and here it is... the Music Video of Ko Ko Bop is out today~^^!!!

11173 profile_image OMG! The choreography is on fire~^^!!!!! 0 2
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profile_image Risa Mae Park Level 9 2017.07.18
OMG! The choreography is on fire~^^!!!!!

11172 profile_image Soups and stews Tteokguk, soup made with tteok, rice cake Soups are a comm... 0 5
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profile_image Shabnam(이슬) Level 9 2017.07.14
Soups and stews


Tteokguk, soup made with tteok, rice cake
Soups are a common part of any Korean meal. Unlike other cultures, in Korean culture, soup is served as part of the main course rather than at the beginning or the end of the meal, as an accompaniment to rice along with other banchan. Soups known as guk are often made with meats, shellfish and vegetables. Soups can be made into more formal soups known as tang, often served as the main dish of the meal. Jjigae are a thicker, heavier seasoned soups or stews.

Some popular types of soups are:

Malgeunguk (맑은국), are flavored with ganjang. Small amounts of long boiled meat may be added to the soup, or seafood both fresh and dried may be added, or vegetables may be the main component for the clear soup.
Tojangguk (토장국) are seasoned with doenjang. Common ingredients for tojang guk include seafood such as clams, dried anchovies, and shrimp. For a spicier soup, gochujang is added.
Gomguk (곰국) or gomtang (곰탕), and they are made from boiling beef bones or cartilage. Originating as a peasant dish, all parts of beef are used, including tail, leg and rib bones with or without meat attached; these are boiled in water to extract fat, marrow, and gelatin to create a rich soup. Some versions of this soup may also use the beef head and intestines. The only seasoning generally used in the soup is salt.
Naengguk (냉국), which are cold soups generally eaten during the summer months to cool the diner. A light hand is usually used in the seasoning of these soups usually using ganjang and sesame oil.
Stews are referred to as jjigae, and are often a shared side dish. Jjigae is often both cooked and served in the glazed earthenware pot (ttukbaegi) in which it is cooked. The most common version of this stew is doenjang jjigae, which is a stew of soybean paste, with many variations; common ingredients include vegetables, saltwater or freshwater fish, and tofu. The stew often changes with the seasons and which ingredients are available. Other common varieties of jjigae contain kimchi (kimchi jjigae) or tofu (sundubu jjigae)

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